1. What is your greatest strength As Electrical Controls Engineer?

This is your time to shine. Just remember the interviewer is looking for work related strengths As Electrical Controls Engineer. Mention a number of them such as being a good motivator, problem solver, performing well under pressure, being loyal, having a positive attitude, eager to learn, taking initiative, and attention to detail. Whichever you go for, be prepared to give examples that illustrate this particular skill.

2. What experience do you have As Electrical Controls Engineer?

The employer would want to know that not only you can do the job but you can make the difference and bring significant contribution – Simple as that.
No doubt that this is your time to perform and present yourself – You have to introduce/sell yourself to the interviewer. Prepare your answer based on your qualification, professional experience and what you've already achieved in your previous jobs. This is your time to express why you think that your professional abilities fit into the job and its requirements.

Top 10 employment experience you'd want to review:
☛ Companies you worked for with dates
☛ The positions you've held
☛ Key projects and responsibilities
☛ Achievements
☛ Coursework & continues education
☛ Expertise
☛ Tools you used (software, hardware)
☛ Knowledge of languages
☛ Engagement with customers and key industry leaders
☛ Team work you were involved (and your contribution)

3. What kind of work interests you the most?

You can talk about what you're passionate about. What motivates you. What excites you.

4. What do you expect from this job As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Talk about the potential career development, your career aspirations, your work relationships and the learning you'll receive.

5. What is your dream job?

There is almost no good answer to this question, so don't be specific. If you tell the interviewer that the job you're applying for with his/her company is the perfect job you may loose credibility if you don't sound believable (which you probably won't if you're not telling the truth.) If you give the interviewer some other job the interviewer may get concerned that you'll get dissatisfied with the position if you're hired. Again, don't be specific. A good response could be, “A job where my work ethic and abilities are recognized and I can make a meaningful difference to the organization.”

6. Where do you see your career in five years As Electrical Controls Engineer?

I would like to retire from this company. I would like to make a difference in the company whether in the company or any other position or area of the company As Electrical Controls Engineer.

7. Are you able to relocate if required?

Be completely honest and thoughtful with this one. You don't want to wake up one to find out that you're moving to a new city or state and it may be a major factor in your eligibility for employment. But again, if you don't want to move then the job probably isn't for you.

8. Why are you interested in working As Electrical Controls Engineer for [insert company name here]?

Bad Answer: They don't have a good reason, or provide a generic answer, "I think it represents a great opportunity."

Good answer: One that shows they've done research on the company, and are truly excited about specific things they can do at the job. This not only shows enthusiasm for the work and basic preparation skills, gives you clues about the cultural fit.

9. What qualities do you look for in a boss?

Remain optimistic and do not be too specific. Good attributes include moral character, honesty, and intelligence since managers usually believe they possess these qualities.

10. Tell me about a difficult decision you've made in the last year As Electrical Controls Engineer?

We all have difficult decisions in our lives. Show how you were able to arrive at it and then how you decisively acted.

11. Can you explain why you changed career paths As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Don't be thrown off by this question-just take a deep breath and explain to the hiring manager why you've made the career decisions As Electrical Controls Engineer you have. More importantly, give a few examples of how your past experience is transferable to the new role. This doesn't have to be a direct connection; in fact, it's often more impressive when a candidate can make seemingly irrelevant experience seem very relevant to the role.

12. Tell me about a time when you had to use your presentation skills to influence someone's opinion As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Example stories could be a class project, an internal meeting presentation, or a customer facing presentation.

13. Top 12 Best Brainteaser Interview Questions:

Brainteaser questions As Electrical Controls Engineer have become popular for interviews in recent years, as word has gotten out that top tech companies such as Apple, Google, Microsoft and IBM have used this type of question at one time or another.

Companies like Google aren't using these questions so much any more, but many companies, are, and it may be good to prepare for them As Electrical Controls Engineer. The key to these isn't so much getting the exact answer, as it is showing how you would come up with an answer.

Here's a sample of 12 of the best and most difficult.

1. How many street lights are there in New York City?

2. How many gas stations are there in the United States?

3. How many golf balls can fit in a school bus?

4. How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?

5. Why are manhole covers round?

6. How many times a day does a clock's hands overlap?

7. How would you test a calculator?

8. Describe the internet to someone who just woke up from a 30-year coma.

9. How much does the Starbucks in Times Square bring in, in annual revenue?

10. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and thrown into a blender. Your mass is reduced so that your density is the same as usual. The blades start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?

11. What is the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow? ;)

12. How many golf balls are there in Florida?

14. What's the difference between good and exceptionally great?

Being good is getting the job done as promised As Electrical Controls Engineer. Being great is delivering the work in an exceptional way that completely exceeds expectations.

15. What is more important to you money or success?

First ask yourself that question before the interview - what are your priorities? Are money and success actual one in the same goal for you? If not, what's more important based on how do you define success?

16. What are your weaknesses for Electrical Controls Engineer position?

Try not to be too critical when answering this question. Instead, pick one of your weaknesses and try to turn it into a positive.
For example, you could be a perfectionist, which means that you sometimes take longer on tasks, but you make sure that they are completed to a high quality. It is important to make a negative into a positive as it doesn't make you appear overly critical and shows you can reflect on your own performance.

17. Have you ever been caught stealing, or better yet, have you ever stole anything?

I guess everyone takes a pen or paper or little things like that. But other than that, NO. I have never stole from my employers or better yet As Electrical Controls Engineer, from anyone.

18. You notice there are too many non productive internal meetings being held, what do you do?

Reach out to your boss and let him know that first you value his leadership and organization but that you are being overwhelmed with the amount of non productive internal meetings.

19. What kind of work interests you the least As Electrical Controls Engineer?

What bores you? What fails to challenge you? What fails to excite you?

20. If you had enough money to retire would you?

Just be honest. If you would retire then say so. But since you can't retire, and the interviewer already knows this, simply answer that since you can't this is type of work you prefer doing. However, if you wouldn't retire if you had the money then explain why. Work is an important element of happiness for most people and many won't retire even when they can.

21. What type of people do you not work well with?

Be very careful answering this question as most organization employ professionals with an array of personalities and characteristics. You don't want to give the impression that you're going to have problems working with anyone currently employed at the organization. If you through out anything trivial you're going to look like a whiner. Only disloyalty to the organization or lawbreaking should be on your list of personal characteristics of people you can't work with.

22. What is your biggest weakness As Electrical Controls Engineer?

No one likes to answer this question because it requires a very delicate balance. You simply can't lie and say you don't have one; you can't trick the interviewer by offering up a personal weakness As Electrical Controls Engineer that is really a strength (“Sometimes, I work too much and don't maintain a work-life balance.”); and you shouldn't be so honest that you throw yourself under the bus (“I'm not a morning person so I'm working on getting to the office on time.”)

23. What is your philosophy towards work?

This is typically a straightforward question that merits a straightforward answer. Do you have strong worth ethic? Will you do whatever it takes to make sure the job gets done? Just say so in your response. Keep it short, direct and positive.

24. Why do you want to join our company?

This is a question that is aimed at finding out whether you know enough about the company and the basic market. The best way to answer this question is to do some research on the company and highlight its positive points.

25. What qualities do you believe are important to have as a manager?

Great managers tend to empower their employees to be successful through strong coaching. They understand how to manage relationships - this is commonly referred to emotional intelligence. They have to be able to handle both client and staff situations that require them to be calm under pressure to clearly think of solutions to complex problems. Most importantly they must be able to articulate the vision to the team and inspire them to work together to collectively achieve that goal

26. How would you feel about working for someone who knows less than you As Electrical Controls Engineer?

The reality is, the majority of the time someone is in a management/leadership position is because of their experience and past success. So they probably possess at least a unique set of knowledge from you. So you'll want to learn from them as much as possible. If it's not the case, then discuss how you would look for mentors in different departments to help your personal career development.

27. How do you feel about this company's vision?

First find out where the company envisions itself in 3-5 years. If you can't find the vision of the company, that's probably a big question mark on the company itself. Once you do, identify how those company's visions align to your personal values and goals and then articulate how tightly correlated that is to the interviewer. For example - this company wants to be the #1 provider of green technology in the world and I feel strongly about that vision because we've got a chance to collectively impact the world to become a greener society and save our clients at the same time!

28. What's been your biggest failure to date?

Describe your biggest failure and discuss what you've learned from it and ideally how you've been successful since because of that lesson.

29. Did you get on well with your last manager?

A dreaded question for many! When answering this question never give a negative answer. “I did not get on with my manager” or “The management did not run the business well” will show you in a negative light and reduce your chance of a job offer. Answer the question positively, emphasizing that you have been looking for a career progression. Start by telling the interviewer what you gained from your last job As Electrical Controls Engineer

30. How important is the vision of the company to you?

It should be very important if you want a long standing career. Remember, you're investing your time, energy and earnings potential into a company so you want to make sure it's a sustainably successful company that will grow with you over the long haul.

31. What have you done to prepare yourself to be a supervisor?

1. Learn from current supervisors (best practices)
2. Mentor others
3. Be exceptionally good at your current job so that it builds your credibility
4. Have a high emotional IQ

32. What do you already know about our company?

Good reputation of a large home grown company that has various departments and product.

33. How would you impact the company?

Consider first the role that you're applying for and then think of 3 ways where you could potentially impact the company's bottom line and top line. Then consider how you impact the company in a creative manner (how do you help productivity, the development of new products, marketing etc - of course this part is specific to the role you're applying for)

34. What role do you see technology playing in this role?

Technology is important to almost every job today but it's not meant to be abused. I believe it's important to increase productivity and not for personal use.

35. Give me a few examples of how you're results oriented?

Make you give an example where you discuss details and metrics. For example, I was a tutor in my last job and mentored 5 students on their SAT test taking skills and raised their scores by 15% on average after a 3 month teaching stint.

36. Tell me about a time when you were held accountable for a problem that you hadn't caused?

If someone puts the blame on you (incorrectly), the best thing you can do is NOT to retaliate. You want to make it known that you were not to blame (explain all the facts) and then focus on fixing the problem in the best way possible.

37. How do you imagine a typical day of an employee in our company As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Just do not say that you imagine to only walk and watch what people do. Rather try to show them your attention to details and proactive attitude to job. Mention that you would try to observe the problems, weaknesses as well as opportunities to improve the results and take measures according to it.

38. Where do you see yourself in five years As Electrical Controls Engineer?

If asked this question, be honest and specific about your future goals, but consider this:
A hiring manager wants to know
☛ a) if you've set realistic expectations for your career,
☛ b) if you have ambition (a.k.a., this interview isn't the first time you're considering the question), and
☛ c) if the position aligns with your goals and growth. Your best bet is to think realistically about where this position could take you and answer along those lines. And if the position isn't necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations?
It's OK to say that you're not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision.

39. What are three positive character traits you don't have?

List three attributes that you aspire to attain / build in the next few years - and then explain how you would develop those.

40. How important is a positive attitude to you?

Incredibly important. I believe a positive attitude is the foundation of being successful - it's contagious in the workplace, with our customers, and ultimately it's the difference maker.

41. What are you most proud of?

You should be proud of all your achievements As Electrical Controls Engineer! We just don't have time to hear them all as interviewers most likely. Focus on 1 really good achievement that showcases characteristics like the following: Integrity, competitiveness, resourcefulness, intelligence, persistence, and so forth.

42. How long do you envision yourself staying with this company?

Understand that companies invest a lot of money into hiring the right staff. You want to emphasize that you are in it for the long run and you want to develop a career there and that it's not just a "5 month stepping stone" type of a job. You should be thinking how you're going to grow with that company. After all, don't you want to invest your energy and time with a company that is going to continue to be successful and one that will help you grow?

43. What are your lifelong dreams?

If your dreams don't relate to the job closely, make sure you highlight aspects of the job that will help develop the skills that will help you with your dreams. Ideally, you want your dreams to relate strongly to the career path you're interviewing for though.

44. Describe what a bad work environment would look like to you As Electrical Controls Engineer?

There could be a multitude of things to discuss here: Business ethics (wrongdoing), inconsiderate teammates, non-supportive management, a product that does not do what you're promising customers and so forth.

45. How do you handle conflicts with people you supervise?

At first place, you try to avoid conflicts if you can. But once it happens and there's no way to avoid it, you try to understand the point of view of the other person and find the solution good for everyone. But you always keep the authority of your position.

46. Describe your academic achievements?

Think of a time where you really stood out and shined within college. It could be a leadership role in a project, it could be your great grades that demonstrate your intelligence and discipline, it could be the fact that you double majored. Where have you shined?

47. What would you like to have accomplished by the end of your career?

Think of 3 major achievements that you'd like to accomplish in your job when all is said and done - and think BIG. You want to show you expect to be a major contributor at the company. It could be creating a revolutionary new product, it could be implementing a new effective way of marketing, etc.

48. Tell me something about your family background?

First, always feel proud while discussing about your family background. Just simple share the details with the things that how they influenced you to work in an airline field.

49. Explain an occasion when you had to adapt in the face of a difficult situation?

One of the most useful interview tactics is to remain positive about your work and achievements. This question lets the candidate draw on their own personal history to show how they have been positive and successful in the face of difficulties. Choose a specific occasion to describe, rather than dealing with generic platitudes.

50. Explain me about your experience working in this field As Electrical Controls Engineer?

I am dedicated, hardworking and great team player for the common goal of the company I work with. I am fast learner and quickly adopt to fast pace and dynamic area. I am well organized, detail oriented and punctual person.

51. What kind of salary do you need As Electrical Controls Engineer?

This is a loaded question and a nasty little game that you will probably lose if you answer first. So, do not answer it. Instead, say something like, that's a tough question. Can you tell me the range for this position? In most cases, the interviewer, taken off guard, will tell you. If not, say that it can depend on the details of the job. Then give a wide range.

52. What do you know about the company?

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company's “About” page. So, when interviewers ask this, they aren't necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission-they want to know whether you care about it. Start with one line that shows you understand the company's goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I'm personally drawn to this mission because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

53. What is your biggest achievement?

Quality work to be is about doing work to the require or set standard, which is very important when it comes to warehouse operations.

54. How would you rate your communication and interpersonal skills for this job As Electrical Controls Engineer?

These are important for support workers. But they differ from the communication skills of a CEO or a desktop support technician. Communication must be adapted to the special ways and needs of the clients. Workers must be able to not only understand and help their clients, but must project empathy and be a warm, humane presence in their lives.

55. What's the most rewarding work you've ever done and why?

Companies love it when you discuss how you've made an impact on your teammates, clients, or partners in the business or in school. It should be rewarding because of the hard work and creative process that you've put into it.

56. What does "thinking outside the box" mean to you?

It means not doing things exactly the same way as everyone else. You've got to challenge the status quo and bring something new to the business.

57. Do you have any questions for me?

Good interview questions to ask interviewers at the end of the job interview include questions on the company growth or expansion, questions on personal development and training and questions on company values, staff retention and company achievements.

58. What do you think we could do better or differently?

This is a common one at startups. Hiring managers want to know that you not only have some background on the company, but that you're able to think critically about it and come to the table with new ideas. So, come with new ideas! What new features would you love to see? How could the company increase conversions? How could customer service be improved? You don't need to have the company's four-year strategy figured out, but do share your thoughts, and more importantly, show how your interests and expertise would lend themselves to the job.

59. Describe a typical work week for this position As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Interviewers expect a candidate for employment to discuss what they do while they are working in detail. Before you answer, consider the position As Electrical Controls Engineer you are applying for and how your current or past positions relate to it. The more you can connect your past experience with the job opening, the more successful you will be at answering the questions.

60. What do you look for in terms of culture -- structured or entrepreneurial?

A good answer is to discuss the importance of having both elements in a company As Electrical Controls Engineer. Structure is good to maintain a focus on priorities and making sure people are productive but having an entrepreneurial spirit can help cultivate new ideas that can truly help the company.

61. How would you motivate your team members to produce the best possible results?

Trying to create competitive atmosphere, trying to motivate the team as a whole, organizing team building activities, building good relationships amongst people.

62. Have you got any questions?

This is your final opportunity to persuade the interviewer that you are the right candidate for the job. Now is not the time to ask questions about holidays, pay or pensions – all these things can be asked later when you get an offer of employment. Now is the time to ask about any reservations that the interviewer may have about your suitability for the role. You will then give yourself one last chance to persuade the interviewer that you are the right candidate for the job.
Example Thank you. I think we have covered everything. Before we finish the interview I would like to take the opportunity to ask if you have any reservations about my suitability for this role?

63. Why are you leaving your current job?

This is a toughie, but one you can be sure you'll be asked. Definitely keep things positive-you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Instead, frame things in a way that shows that you're eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you're interviewing for is a better fit for you than your current or last position. For example, “I'd really love to be part of product development from beginning to end, and I know I'd have that opportunity here.” And if you were let go? Keep it simple: “Unfortunately, I was let go,” is a totally OK answer.

64. Why do you want to work As Electrical Controls Engineer for this organisation?

Being unfamiliar with the organisation will spoil your chances with 75% of interviewers, according to one survey, so take this chance to show you have done your preparation and know the company inside and out. You will now have the chance to demonstrate that you've done your research, so reply mentioning all the positive things you have found out about the organisation and its sector etc. This means you'll have an enjoyable work environment and stability of employment etc – everything that brings out the best in you.

65. Do you think you have enough experience As Electrical Controls Engineer?

If you do not have the experience they need, you need to show the employer that you have the skills, qualities and knowledge that will make you equal to people with experience but not necessary the skills. It is also good to add how quick you can pick up the routine of a new job role.

66. What do you know about this department?

One good way to find out about the department is to try to "informally" interview the existing employees over coffee (outside of the office) if possible. It's hard if you don't have any connections there, but if you do a great way to learn about it. Other than that, it's often hard to learn about the department so you can turn the table back on them by asking questions to learn about it.

67. Where do you see yourself professionally five years from now As Electrical Controls Engineer?

Demonstrate both loyalty and ambition in the answer to this question. After sharing your personal ambition, it may be a good time to ask the interviewer if your ambitions match those of the company.

68. Are you planning to continue your studies and training As Electrical Controls Engineer?

If asked about plans for continued education, companies typically look for applicants to tie independent goals with the aims of the employer. Interviewers consistently want to see motivation to learn and improve. Continuing education shows such desires, especially when potentials display interests in academia potentially benefiting the company.
Answering in terms of “I plan on continuing my studies in the technology field,” when offered a question from a technology firm makes sense. Tailor answers about continued studies specific to desired job fields. Show interest in the industry and a desire to work long-term in said industry. Keep answers short and to the point, avoiding diatribes causing candidates to appear insincere.

69. What were the responsibilities of your last position As Electrical Controls Engineer?

If you want to show your ambition, you can discuss how you haven't reached all of your goals yet and in that sense aren't satisfied. However, if you want to discuss satisfaction from your job discuss an experience in which you achieved something.