1. Who is a translator?

Translator is a person whose job is to translate languages in the form of a written communication.

2. How many languages do you know?

Mention only those language in which you are completely confident.

3. What resources do you use for translations?

Tell them that you use CAT (Computer assisted translation) for eg. Google Translate and you also refer dictionaries for a better vocabulary content.

4. What salary do you expect as Translator?

Do some research about how much other people in the same profession are paid and then put some numbers which are reasonable from the starter's point of you.

5. Is this opportunity a good fit for you?

It would be a great opportunity to jumpstart my career as an interpreter.

6. Who is an interpreter?

Interpreter is a person whose job is to translate languages in the form of a spoken communication.

7. What interpreting experience do you have?

I worked as a medical interpreter on weekends and evening. Normally helping with Labors and patients on need of rehabilitation.

8. What languages are you fluent in?

Spanish english american sign language.

9. What is so special about being an interpreter?

Being the facilitator of language and communication is a crucial role no matter what the information or content might be.

10. How long have you been an interpreter?

I have been working as an interpreter since April 2014

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11. Do you have any questions to ask us feel free to ask?

It is recommended to ask questions, Ask something related to your job. Don't ask about the salary.

12. Share with me what is your biggest weakness?

Don't mention anything that can take your job away, a few suggestions from my side are: talkative, can't say 'NO', etc.

13. What kinds of people do you have the most difficulty working with?

The patients who is looking for control medication, and the patient who want something that is out of my hand.

14. What have you done to prepare for this job?

I researched on online what types of questions are usually asked in the interview.

15. Tell me do you feel you have what it takes to perform the role as an interpreter successfully?

I do have a very good knowledge for the thing that I am doing. Also with more study and learning more about the job description I can be very successfully.

16. Do you have any certification as a translator or an interpreter?

Explain about the courses you did and the share the certificate details such as the information about the institutes, course outcomes, time period of course, etc.

17. What have you learned from your past experience as a translator?

Give some better example about how your past experience made you learn new things and how did it help you to improve yourself even better.

18. Tell me are there any pitfalls to avoid in the translation business?

There are plenty of unscrupulous individuals, businesses and organizations out there that take advantage of translators and pay them for their work only after many months have passed, if at all. I've always found this practice to be unconscionable because translators - at least the professional ones, anyway - work hard to meet their deadlines and turn in their work on time, and the least their clients can do, if they value their translation talent at all, is to return the favor by paying them in a timely manner. Subscribe to a resource such as the ProZ.com Blue Board, the TCR List, or the Payment Practices List to find out who the prompt payers, the slow payers, and the non-payers are.

19. Suppose there was some mistake done by you in misunderstanding things, What would you do?

I will make sure that I verify things before sending them further. But in case if there is any such situation then I will come forward to apologize and correct my mistake.

20. Suppose you are very good in your job and you boss assigns you a big load of work, how will you manage?

Tell them that you will do it only if you are sure that you will finish it. Else you will ask the boss to assign some juniors to help you and you will work as a team with them.

21. Do you know why is this the right job/position for you?

Potential employers will try to assess how well you'd fit into the job/position for which you are interviewing. Anticipate such questions as:

► Do you have a passion for this type of work?
► Do you see yourself staying in this kind of work for a long time?
► Is this opportunity a good fit for you?
► Do you feel you have what it takes to perform the role as an interpreter successfully?

You need to be convincing without going overboard. This is important to do a self analysis of yourself and the future of your career as an interpreter. If you do not have any of the above, you would be dragging yourself into a miserable life. Do not do this for money, do this because you enjoy being an interpreter and interacting with the Deaf and various of jobs.

22. Tell us how do you handle stressful situations?

I handle stressful situations first by listening and then reasoning or giving priority to what is important.

23. Why are you interested in working with us?

You cover the area I live it and I believe that it will be convenient for my work.

24. Tell me what kinds of people do you have the most difficulty working with?

Tell them you manage to work with almost all kind of people. You can add that you sometimes face problems working with people who have arrogant behavior.

25. Tell me about a time when you failed to complete a task assigned to you on time?

This is a pure behavioral question. Give them an example where you failed to do things on time due to some external problems or issues. Do not mention the examples which can ruin your job.

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26. Describe about your typical work for the position of an translator?

The job of a translator is to convert a given content from one language to another in a written format, Convert concepts in the source language to equivalent concepts in the target language and Compile information, such as technical terms used in legal settings, into glossaries and terminology databases to be used in translations.

27. Why do you want to join this translator's/interpreter's job?

Companies are searching for people who work with full efforts and are passionate about their job. Tell them about how your skills are best for this job.

28. Do you feel you have what it takes to perform the role as an interpreter successfully?

I do have a very good knowledge for the thing that I am doing. Also with more study and learning more about the job description I can be very successfully.

29. Interviewer and Interviewee Questions for Interpreters:

► How well can you understand different dialects and accents?
► What do you think about people who speak different dialects or who, for example, code switch? (Sometimes this may be called "Tex Mex" or "Pocho").
► What would you do if you were interpreting and a person said something that you did not agree with?
► What would you do if you were interpreting and a person became very angry and used profane language?
► What would you do if you were interpreting and a person became very angry and used profane gestures which are not understood in the culture of the other person?
► When you are interpreting, do you try to establish a bond with the person or do you try to keep the relationship formal and more detached?
► What would you do if additional cultural information or an explanatory comment is needed to aid comprehension or for a culturally appropriate translation?
► What do you do if a person is going on and on, and you can't remember exactly everything that person said, but you did get the general "drift?"
► Do you try to translate every single word or idea expressed, or do you try to summarize what was said?
► If a client has confidence in you and asks for advice on how to answer a question during an interpretation session, what do you do?
► What, if anything, would you do before an interpretation session?
► What, if anything, would you do after an interpretation session?
► What would you do if you were asked to interpret or translate something for which you do not feel qualified or prepared?
► What would you do if you made a mistake in interpretation or did not understand a term?"

30. Behavioral Language translator interview questions:

► Do you think you are overqualified for this position?
► Have you done this kind of work before?
► What do you like and dislike about the job we are discussing?
► Has anything ever irritated you about people you've worked with?
► What kind of personality do you work best with and why?

31. Communication skills Based Language translator interview questions:

► Time when you made a suggestion to improve the work.
► What assignment was too difficult for you?
► What do you think this position involves.
► What do you consider your most significant accomplishment?
► What's most important to you in a new position?

Just confine your words to better opportunities. Say something relevant to the objective line in the resume. Be prepared to discuss in detail and with examples your five or six main attributes.

32. Situational Language translator interview questions:

☛ How would you weigh a plane without scales?
☛ Situation in which you had to arrive at a compromise.
☛ What parts of your education do you see as relevant to this position?
☛ Which subjects did you enjoy during your qualifying degree?
☛ What relevant experience do you have?

33. Competency Based Language translator interview questions:

► Who was your favorite manager and why?
► Can you describe a time when your work was criticized?
► What were your annual goals at your most current employer?
► What are your expectations regarding promotions and salary increases?
► What are three positive things your last boss would say about you?

Be very thoughtful about your answer. Your answer should be focused on what you can bring to the role that will be of benefit to the company. Focus on positive achievements and views.

34. Strengths and Weaknesses Based Language translator interview questions:

► Describe a time you were faced with stresses which tested your skills.
► Do you have the qualities and skills necessary to succeed in your career?
► How do you see your job relating to the overall goals?
► Tell us about the last time you had to negotiate with someone.
► What do you believe are your key strengths?

Never use any adjectives for these sort of Language translator interview questions.
Prepare a list of things you want to say in the interview. The interviewers want to know the real you, the potential candidate they may accept in.

35. Translator Job Interview Questions:

► What types of clients do you typically work with?
► Would you ever want to work on your own and start your own freelance translation business or translation agency?
► What kinds of people do you have the most difficulty working with?
► Do you have a certain area of specialization or do you work on generic translation projects of many types?
► Do you hold any translation certifications?
► What type of ethical dilemmas have you encountered as a translator and how did you deal with those?
► How well can you understand different dialects and accents?
► What would you do if you were interpreting and a person said something that you did not agree with or found upsetting?
► What would you do if you were interpreting and a person used gestures which are not understood in the culture of the other person?
► When you are interpreting, do you try to establish a relationship with the person or do you try to keep the relationship formal and more detached?
► What do you do if you didn't hear exactly what a person said but you get the general "gist"?
► Do you try to translate every single word or idea expressed, or do you try to summarize what was said?
► Do you do anything to prepare for a translating session?
► What would you do if you made a mistake in translation or did not understand a term?

36. Video Based Language translator interview questions:

► What attracted you to this company?
► How do you think you can make a contribution to this company?
► What was the most difficult period in your life, and how did you deal with it?
► What were the responsibilities of your last position?
► What would you say are your strong points?

Study the specific job duties of the position desired. Your answer should be focused on what you can bring to the role that will be of benefit to the company. Always focus on the positive reason such you were seeking the opportunity to expand your career opportunities.

37. Phone Based Language translator interview questions:

► What was the most stressful situation you have faced?
► If you were hiring a person for this job, what would you look for?
► What are your long-term goals or career plans?
► What are the qualities of a good leader?
► What is your greatest achievement outside of work?

Emphasize benefits to the company.
Don't talk about previous experience that is not related to the position in question.
You may receive very helpful advice from an outsider who, like the interviewers, may tell if you answer properly or not.

38. Basic Language translator interview questions:

► Give an example of a time you successfully worked on a team.
► Describe a situation where you had to plan or organise something.
► Example when you went above and beyond the call of duty.
► Do you work well under pressure?
► Are you planning to continue your studies?

Your answer will affect the rest of the interview. Prepare a list of things you want to say in the interview.
Prepare to talk about your hobbies, interests, and how you would react in certain situations.

39. Typical translators job interview questions:

► What languages can you translate into and from?
► How many years of translation experience do you hold?
► What types of clients do you typically work with?
► Why did you leave your last translation position or job?
► Would you ever want to work on your own and start your own freelance translation business or translation agency?
► How much do you currently charge for your translation work?
► Do you have any references available that we could speak with regarding the quality of your work?
► Did you bring any sample translations with you today?
► Do you have a certain area of specialization or do you work on generic translation projects of many types?
► What is your biggest strength as a translator? Biggest weakness?
► Do you hold any translation certifications?
► Why do you enjoy being a translator?
► What type of ethical dilemmas have you encountered as a translator and how did you deal with those?
► Have you had any client or employer conflicts in the past over translation projects not being completed on time or accurately?
► Where do you want to be in your translation career in 4 or 5 years from now?

40. Tell me why you're the right fit for this job as Translator?

The interviewer already has your resume and cover letter, so she's not looking for a rundown of your employment history. Nor does she care that you grew up in Boston and love to jog on the weekends. She's looking for a pitch-one that's concise, compelling, and keeps her attention, and one that tells her exactly why you're the right fit for the job.

So, while this is a good time to paint a broad picture of who you are, it's most important that you include a couple of key facts that will sell you as the right candidate.

Think about the 2-3 specific accomplishments or experiences that you most want the interviewer to know about, and share them here. You can frame your stories or tie them together using a theme or a quote, if appropriate, such as "My first boss told me that fundraising is really building relationships, and that's the approach I've taken throughout my career. For example…"

It's also a good idea to practice your answer aloud, record it, then listen to your pitch. Are you engaging? Are you rambling? Are you getting your most important points across loud and clear? (This is good advice for any interview question.)

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41. Do you see yourself staying in this kind of work for a long time?

Yes I can see my self staying for long time, because I see my self in this job, but if there is a better opportunity in the organization why not to develop my self.

42. What do you do if you didn't hear exactly what a person said but you get the general "gist"?

I have to ask him to repeat, and give me part by part to give the doctor the full image.

43. What would you do if you were interpreting and a person said something that you did not agree with or found upsetting?

Don't say that you will start arguing with that person, tell them that you will understand the problem and then try to correct yourself.

44. What has been your biggest professional challenge?

I can't say that I've had any overarching professional challenges since I started, just a lot of little ones every day. No two documents are alike, so every single one that comes across my desk presents a new little puzzle to unlock, and presents at least one new thing for me to learn. In this profession I'm always challenged, I'm always learning, and I'm never bored.

Now, with regard to my most challenging project, I would have to say that one of them was definitely working with the district attorney's office of Athens-Clarke County on a murder case involving a Mexican suspect. I was asked to do a "transcriptlation" of his interview with the investigator and testify as an expert witness during the trial, answering various questions from the prosecution and defense about my qualifications, Mexican slang, gangland terminology, etc. What unsettled me was not the questions that the defense was firing at me in an attempt to establish doubt as to the accuracy of the translation, but the fact that the suspect was staring at me quite aggressively the entire time, trying to intimidate me, I suppose. It was a little scary but I stayed focused and the DA told me I did a great job.

45. Describe about this object in two different languages?

They will give you an object for eg. pen, book, file, etc. and ask you to describe about it in one language. And then they will test your skills how good can you explain the same object in some other language.

46. Tell me have you really been listening?

It's easy to go into an interview with a list of questions about the position. But the tougher part-and what the interviewer really wants to see-is whether you can roll with the punches, engage in the conversation, and ask questions that weren't already answered over the course of the interview.

This will require some thinking on your feet. As you're going along in the interview, be thinking which key areas-job duties, company culture, the team you'll be working with-haven't been covered yet, so you can target your questions there. You can also prepare ahead of time by thinking of more non-traditional questions, or ask questions targeted to the interviewer herself, which probably won't be covered in the interview.

Try things like: What you like most about working here? What drew you to work for this organization? What do you think are the current strategic challenges facing the organization? What advice would you give to someone in this role?

47. How well can you understand different dialects and accents?

I have two nationality with huge knowledge of the arab languages which it make me the best one for this job.

48. When you are interpreting, do you try to establish a relationship with the person or do you try to keep the relationship formal and more detached?

I will try to establish relations for my clients for there may be chances to attain your next interpreting opportunities.

49. Where have you gained the experience necessary to perform the job as an interpreter?

Everyday in my duty, I am helping the patients for translate, also I am helping the doctors for translate if there are no available translator.

50. Tell me about your interpreter experiences

I do not have an exprience but having an understanding of what is expected of me.I have gained an understanding from the observation that i did during my studies.

51. How will you like to work with us, as a part timer or a full timer?

Tell the way you are comfortable with so that it will be easier for them to assign tasks to you in future.

52. Explain what advice would you give to an up and coming translator?

If you're freelancing, get out from behind that computer and network, network, network. Then, when you're sick of all that networking, network some more. This is how you get work. After you're well established and word of mouth has gained a momentum of its own, you won't need to pound the pavement nearly as much, but in the beginning you definitely need to dedicate every spare moment you can to marketing your services.

Also, don't generalize; pick one or two specializations you enjoy and carve your niche in those specializations. If you do that, clients will turn to you again and again as the "go to" person for those specializations, and you'll get to work in a subject you like. To paraphrase a popular saying, do what you love and the money will come later; if it doesn't, hey, at least you're doing what you love. I have a passion for wines and actually have an intermediate certification in wines and spirits from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET), so from time to time I'm approached by wineries to translate their marketing materials for an American audience.

53. Tell us something more about how CAT tools works?

Computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools, in which a computer database of previously translated sentences or segments (Translation Memories) may be used to translate new text. CAT tools allow translators to work more efficiently and consistently.

54. What, if anything, would you do before an interpretation session?

I will make sure that I am comfortable with both the languages, I will also keep some reference sources such as a dictionary for technical words.

55. Suppose you got a client who wants the things translated from Spanish or any other language to English, but you don't know that language. What would you do?

Say them that you will use some CAT tools such as Google Translate, understand and simplify things and give it to the client.

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56. Explain to me what are your strengths?

Tell them that you are a good communicator, you are hard working and try your level bests to complete your tasks.

57. Tell Me Who Are You?

One of the most common interview tactics is to ask you to tell the interviewers something about yourself.

► Keep it factual
► Keep it honest
► Keep it simple and to the point
► Keep it related to the job you are interested in
► This is not the time to share your life story or any other personal stories

Just what kind of person are you? Be honest about who you are. Employers will truly look into that when hiring someone. Employers are always looking for employees to match with other people who you interact with, how you interact with other people, how you respond about yourself.

58. How good are your speaking skills?

Tell them you can speak languages such as English, Spanish, etc. (Any language you are comfortable with) fluently. You can also share about a few debate or declamation competitions that you may have participated or won.

59. Explain to me do you care about our work?

Hiring someone is an investment, and interviewers believe (as you would expect) that someone genuinely interested in the organization's work will be the better hire. So, what she really wants to know is whether this particular job and company is part of your career path, or whether you'll be jumping ship in a year once you land your "real" dream job.

So how should you answer? If the position you're interviewing for is on the track to your goals, share that, plus give some specifics. For example, if you're interviewing for an account executive position an advertising firm, and you know your goal is to become an account supervisor, say that. And then add specifics about the sort of clients you hope to work with, which will help your answer sound genuine, not canned-and again show why this particular company will be a good fit.

If the position isn't necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations, the best approach is to be genuine, but to follow your answer up by connecting the dots between the specific duties in this role and your future goals. It's OK to say that you're not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision, or that you're excited about the management or communications skills you'll gain.

60. Tell me what makes you the best person for this job?

I am a fast learner,and desire to provide service to those people who struggle for services because of language barriers.

61. Have you taken classes/workshops to expand your education and skills that will help as an interpreter?

I have never took any classes for that, its kind of thing that I like to do.

62. What types of clients do you typically work with?

My work clients are patients. Which I have to give them all the patients and I have to show them empathy and sympathy.

63. Tell me any of your funniest translation story?

I find plenty of little things to giggle about in my job on a daily basis because Spanish and English are, to me, two of the funniest languages on earth, so I can't think of any one incident that would top the others in funniness. That said, I do get a laugh out of the reaction I get from clients when they find out what my ethnic background is and find out that I acquired my foreign languages exclusively through my education and travels. I'm Middle Eastern, not Latina, so I have no family connections to the Spanish-speaking world, and I grew up in a household that spoke only English.

64. What do you know about our company, if yes then what?

Please note that you should know at least 80% about the functions performed by the company. You need to do a little homework well in advance.

65. Why should we hire you as an translator?

Tell them that you are good at your literary and vocabulary skills which fits you best for this job.

66. Describe about your typical work for the position of an interpreter?

As an interpreter I will be given some content which may be one language and I will have to translate it orally into some other language, Relay the style and tone of the original language and Render spoken messages accurately, quickly, and clearly.

67. What have you done to prepare for this job as Translator?

This part is important to prepare for any jobs you desire to work. If you have an interest for a job and prepare, you would be interested in staying longer (possibly or not)

Did you meet with other people in the line of work?
Did you perform a job shadow or mentorship/internship?
Did you meet with any of the interpreters who works for the agency?
Have you made every effort to learn as much as you can about the company and its operation?
Do you know much about the owner of the agency and how they are?
This is very important to understand information about the company itself. Companies are interested in what you know and how much you know. Many wants to see potential employees to have an interest in working with them and take pride in working with the company by taking extra time in learning who and what the company is about.

68. Do you find this job challenging?

Say that there are challenges in this job, but you will work hard to overcome them.

69. Tell us can you be an ambassador for our organization?

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company's "About" page. So, when an interviewer asks you this, she isn't necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission-she wants to know whether you care about it, and she's looking for who in the applicant pool can most effectively discuss the organization's work and its impact.

So, in addition to doing your research on the company's work, think about concrete ways it relates to your passions and experiences, and weave them into your answer.

Start with one line that shows you understand the mission, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, "I'm personally drawn to this mission because…" or "I really believe in this approach because…" and share a personal example or two. For example, if you're interviewing at a school that stresses character, share some specific character-building education activities you've led for students in your last job. If you're interviewing for a position at a hospital, talk about the 5K you recently ran to raise money for leukemia or your passion for volunteering your time to help children with cancer.

70. What can you do for us that other candidates can not?

I am a native Spanish speaking , I have work my way up to learn and graduate from school not knowing English when I came to this country , I am strong and take seriously my job, my life, everything and I put 110% to get the things done and learn everyday .

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71. Do you have a passion for this type of work?

Yes, I have a passion of languages; therefore interpretation is a passion for me.

72. Do you want to keep learning and developing yourself?

Definitely, I am a life long learner; and I have received several certificates in languages and communication.

73. When did you decide to become an interpreter and why?

When I discovered that I was good at several languages, and a good experience, I decided to become an interpreter. My first aim is to help break language barriers while making some money.

74. What would you do if you were interpreting and a person used gestures which are not understood in the culture of the other person?

In medical training program, I learned that we have to interpret everything the patient say or what ever gesture they do. In the role of interpreter, I just interpret exactly what ever gesture they make.

75. Did you perform a job shadow or mentor-ship/internship?

As an interpreter no, but I did shadowed language tour guides to learn how to conduct tours in foreign languages.

76. What have you learned from your mistakes in your last job or project taken?

Do not committed mistakes, be honest and just share a small mistake which is not more related to your job and share about what all positive things you learnt from it.

77. Tell us somthing about your education?

Tell about the education degrees you have completed in your past. You can also mention the status of your current education if you are doing some higher degrees such as PhD. or some other.

78. Where did you gain experience as Translator?

You'll always be asked about your interpreting experience. You can prepare ahead of time by asking yourself the following questions, and being prepared to provide this information to your interviewer when asked.

► Did you attend ITP or take interpreting classes to understand how it works in the interpreting world?
► Have you taken classes/workshops to expand your education and skills that will help as an interpreter?
► Have you trained in positions that are relevant to the interpreting assignments (ie. medical, legal, workshops, etc)
► Where did you work?
► What interpreting experience do you have?
► How long have you been an interpreter? Specifically, certified? State credential?
► Did you take on any additional responsibilities as an interpreter to enhance your skills?
► Did you identify problem areas and improved those areas to enhance quality service?
► What have you done that will show me that you can do this job?

Many companies are curious what your past experience or what you have done to enhance your education or learning for improvement. When someone takes the time to go to workshops/classes or accept feedback (both pro/con) graciously and improve upon it in an effort to provide better service is something that companies do look for.

79. Tell me how did you land your first translation job?

I got my first job through Georgetown University right after I'd graduated from their program. A prestigious law firm needed a freelancer to translate some correspondence that was going to be presented in an international lawsuit, so they called Georgetown asking for the names and phone numbers of the most recent graduates of the Spanish to English program, and contacted me.

80. Why should we hire you as an interpreter?

Tell them that you are very good at your speaking skills. You comfortable is fluently speaking the languages you know.