Routing Questions and Answers
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1 :: How to filter out the default route from outgoing BGP advertisements?

Assuming you have a static default route that is redistributed because redistribute-static parameter is set to yes, do the following:

/routing filter add chain=myfilter prefix=0.0.0.0/0 action=discard

Then set myfilter as the out-filter for BGP instance

/routing bgp instance set default out-filter=myfilter
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2 :: How does /ip route check-gateway work?

check-gateway sends pings every 10 seconds. if two successive pings fail, the gateway is considered dead.
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3 :: How to Set a Netmask under Solaris?

In order to include a permanent netmask on your Solaris machine, you must make an entry in the /etc/netmasks file, in the following format: network-address netmask For example: %%%% cat /etc/netmasks 150.101.0.0 255.255.255.0 The above would subnet the class B network, 150.101.0.0, into 254 subnets, from 150.101.1.0 to 150.101.254.0. In 2.5.1 and below, only one entry for the entire class network is allowed to support standard subnetting as specified in RFC-950 It is important to note that the entry in the left hand column must be the original base network number (ie #.0.0.0 for a Class A, #.#.0.0 for a Class B and #.#.#.0 for a Class C), not the subnet. The 2.6 kernel has changed to support VLSM. It is now possible to combine the RFC-950 and RFC-1519 form of subnet masks in the netmasks file. The network address should be the "SUBNETTED" address NOT the standard network number based on the hosts ip address. (see man page for netmasks) Here are a few examples: A host address 192.188.206.65 with a netmask of 255.255.255.224 /etc/netmasks 192.188.206.64 255.255.255.224 A host address 172.31.16.193 with a netmask of 255.255.255.192 /etc/netmasks 172.31.16.192 255.255.255.192
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4 :: How to Set a Netmask under SunOS?

In order to include a permanent netmask on your SunOS machine, you must make an entry in the /etc/netmasks file, in the following format: network-address-without-zeroes netmask For example: %%%% cat /etc/netmasks 150.101 255.255.255.0 The above would subnet the class B network, 150.101.0.0, into 254 subnets, from 150.101.1.0 to 150.101.254.0. It is important to note that the entry in the left hand column must be the original base network number (ie # for a Class A, #.# for a Class B and #.#.# for a Class C), not the subnet.
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5 :: How to Force a Solaris Machine Not to Be a Router?

If you do not want your multiple-interface machine, running Solaris 2.4 or lower, to route packets, you just need to make a small change to the file /etc/init.d/inetinit. Find the following two lines: numifs=`ifconfig -au grep inet wc -l` numptptifs=`ifconfig -au grep inet egrep -e '-->' wc -l` And immediately after them, insert the following: numifs=2 numptptifs=0 After the machine next reboots, it will not act as a router. If you are using Solaris 2.5 or greater, it's even easier to make your machine not route packets. Simply create an /etc/notrouter file: %% touch /etc/notrouter Afterwards, reboot the machine. It may be useful to note, that on Solaris machines, ip_forwarding can have three values: 0 Never Forward 1 Always Forward 2 Only forward when two or more interfaces are up The above steps result in the ndd /dev/ip ip_forwarding variable being changed from "1" to "0", which prevents routing.
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