1. Explain what is cash flow and fund flow?

Cash flow and funds flow: cash flow means direct entry of cash in your business and exit of the same funds flow means entry of funds (cash funds or non cash funds) and their exit non cash funds may mean rise in current assets or fall in current liabilities which was not due to any cash movement

2. Explain Accounting for VC money in financials?

It depends on the form in which the money comes in. If it was invested as equity (either Common or Preferred Stock), it shows up on the balance sheet as Paid in Capital. If it came in as debt (such as bridge loan, secured note, etc.) it shows up as debt that must be repaid by the company.

3. Tell me what is the difference between provision and reverse?

Provisions are created in books as they are anticipated. Example: provision for depreciation

Reserves are created in books as a part of profits, which might used to purchase assets or to declare dividends.

4. Tell me is financial accounting necessary?

Yes, the accounting calculates the cost of capital to the business. It compares the current, expected, and historic rates of return. Suppose a company is making 12% returns but borrowing money by using the owner's credit card at 22% be good to know that.

5. Is there a difference between accounting for conversion of bonds and accounting for the conversion of preferred stock?

Bonds have discounts and premiums and accrued interest. Preferred Stock does not.

6. Tell me what does the word credit mean in terms of accounting?

The word "credit" is part of the equation of double entry bookkeeping.

In order for bookkeeping entries to balance, there must always be a debit (left side, abbreviated by "dr") and credit (right side, abbreviated by "cr") entry that equal one another.

For example, to record an Office Supply Store purchase (on account ~ a payable), the entry would be:

Office Supplies Exp $500.00(dr)

Accounts Payable $500.00(cr)

If an entry does not balance the totals for debits and credits, your books will be out of balance.

7. How many invoices on average do you handle on a weekly/monthly basis?

Show your understanding of the invoice verification process. Go through each step in detail such as checking that goods have been received in proper condition or services rendered in a satisfactory manner. Explain the importance of each step.

8. Explain what is customer account?

Debtors account and bills receivable account are theoretically same. Both are called as receivables. When we sold goods to debtors account is debited. If we receive a bill from that debtor, we open bills receivable account by closing that debtor account. Thus, bills receivable account is nothing but debtor account. If the bill is dishonored on the due date, we again debit the debtor account in our books. For information and accounting purpose, we use both debtor account and bills receivable account.

9. Were you happy with the grades you achieved at A-level?

Chartered Accountancy firms put a lot of weight on A-level grades as these have been found to be the best predictors of success in professional examinations.

If your A levels were not outstanding, this may sometimes depend more on the quality of the school you attended than your ability. In some inner-city schools it may be that a mediocre A-level performance that you achieved might have been the best in your school - if this is so, then make it clear. An average performance at a weak school academically may be the equivalent of a much better performance at some prestigious establishments.

Similarly, if there were any other external factors, such as illness, that may have affected your grades, tell the interviewers - but don't sound as though you are making excuses.

10. What is the Entry for Provision? What is the Provision?

Provision means liabilities it means payable account A it?s an very useful for controlling payable accounts like telephone charges, ESIC accounts, EPF accounts, A EPF payable accounts Dr to EPF accounts ESIC payable accounts Dr to ESIC account

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