1. Do search engines dislike frames?

Search engines can link directly to framed content documents, but they cannot link to the combinations of frames for which those content documents were designed. This is the result of a fundamental flaw in the design of frames.
Search engines try to provide their users with links to useful documents. Many framed content documents are difficult to use when accessed directly (outside their intended frameset), so there is little benefit if search engines offer links to them. Therefore, many search engines ignore frames completely and go about indexing more useful (non-framed) documents.
Search engines will index your <NOFRAMES> content, and any content that is accessible via your

2. How do I make a frame with a vertical scrollbar but without a horizontal scrollbar?

The only way to have a frame with a vertical scrollbar but without a horizontal scrollbar is to define the frame with SCROLLING="auto" (the default), and to have content that does not require horizontal scrolling. There is no way to specify that a frame should have one scrollbar but not the other. Using SCROLLING="yes" will force scrollbars in both directions (even when they aren't needed), and using SCROLLING="no" will inhibit all scrollbars (even when scrolling is necessary to access the frame's content). There are no other values for the SCROLLING attribute.

3. Why do my links open new windows rather than update an existing frame?

If there is no existing frame with the name you used for the TARGET attribute, then a new browser window will be opened, and this window will be assigned the name you used. Furthermore, TARGET="_blank" will open a new, unnamed browser window.
In HTML 4, the TARGET attribute value is case-insensitive, so that abc and ABC both refer to the same frame/window, and _top and _TOP both have the same meaning. However, most browsers treat the TARGET attribute value as case-sensitive and do not recognize ABC as being the same as abc, or _TOP as having the special meaning of _top.
Also, some browsers include a security feature that prevents documents from being hijacked by third-party framesets. In these browsers, if a document's link targets a frame defined by a frameset document that is located on a different server than the document itself, then the link opens in a new window instead.

4. Why does the browser show my plain HTML source?

If Microsoft Internet Explorer displays your document normally, but other browsers display your plain HTML source, then most likely your web server is sending the document with the MIME type "text/plain". Your web server needs to be configured to send that filename with the MIME type "text/html". Often, using the filename extension ".html" or ".htm" is all that is necessary. If you are seeing this behavior while viewing your HTML documents on your local Windows filesystem, then your text editor may have added a ".txt" filename extension automatically. You should rename filename.html.txt to filename.html so that Windows will treat the file as an HTML document.

5. When I try to upload my site, all my images are X s. How do I get them to load correctly?

They are a few reasons that this could happen. The most common are:

1. You're attempting to use a .bmp or .tif or other non-supported file format. You can only use .gif and .jpg on the web. You must convert files that are not .gif or .jpg into a .gif or .jpg with your image/graphics program.
2. You've forgotten to upload the graphic files. Double-Check.
3. You've incorrectly linked to the images. When you are starting out, try just using the file name in the <img> tag. If you have cat.jpg, use
img src="cat.jpg">.
4. Image file names are case-sensitive. If your file is called CaT.JpG, you cannot type cat.jpg, you must type CaT.JpG exactly in the src.
5. If all of the above fail, re-upload the image in BINARY mode. You may have accidentally uploaded the image in ASCII mode.

6. Can I have two or more Submit buttons in the same form?

Yes. This is part of HTML 2.0 Forms support (some early browsers did not support it, but browser coverage is now excellent).
The submit buttons must have a NAME attribute. The optional VALUE attribute can be used to specify different text for the different submit buttons.
To determine which submit button was used, you need to use different values for the NAME and/or VALUE attributes. Browsers will send to the server the name=value pair of the submit button that was used. Here is an example:

<input type="submit" name="join" value="I want to join now">
<input type="submit" name="info" value="Please send full details">

Note that if you are using image submit buttons, you need to provide different NAME attributes for them too. Also, browser behavior can be inconsistent when the form is submitted without a submit button (e.g., by hitting ENTER).
If you're unsure what results you're going to get when you submit your form, TipJar has a standard script which you can use. Code this, for example (assuming method "post"):

<form method="post" action="http://www.yoursite.com/cgi-bin/test">
and then go through the motions of submitting your form. The TipJar server decodes the form input, and displays the result to you.

7. How do I make sure my framed documents are displayed inside their frameset?

When the sub-documents of a frameset state are accessed directly, they appear without the context of the surrounding frameset.
If the reader's browser has JavaScript support enabled, the following script will restore the frameset:

<SCRIPT TYPE="text/javascript">
if (parent.location.href == self.location.href) {
if (window.location.href.replace)
// causes problems with back button, but works
window.location.href = 'frameset.html';
A more universal approach is a "restore frames" link:

<A HREF="frameset.html" TARGET="_top">Restore Frames
Note that in either case, you must have a separate frameset document for every content document. If you link to the default frameset document, then your reader will get the default content document, rather than the content document he/she was trying to access. These frameset documents should be generated automatically, to avoid the tedium and inaccuracy of creating them by hand.
Note that you can work around the problem with bookmarking frameset states by linking to these separate frameset documents using TARGET="_top", rather than linking to the individual content documents.

8. How do you create tabs or indents in Web pages?

There was atag proposed for HTML 3.0, but it was never adopted by any major browser and the draft specification has now expired. You can simulate a tab or indent in various ways, including using a transparent GIF, but none are quite as satisfactory or widely supported as an official tag would be.

9. How do I keep people from stealing my source code and/or images?

Because copies of your HTML files and images are stored in cache, it is impossible to prevent someone from being able to save them onto their hard drive. If you are concerned about your images, you may wish to embed a watermark with your information into the image. Consult your image editing program's help file for more details.

10. How to transferring user to new web page automatically?

You will need to use the below meta tag.
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Refresh" CONTENT="2"; URL="http://www.yourname.com">
Placing the above tag in your <HEAD></HEAD> will load yousite.com in 2 seconds.
Changing the 2 value on CONTENT="2" to another value will increase or decrease the delay until loading the new page.

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