1. Do you know how to evaluate the lesson?

Teaching a one-off lesson in an unfamiliar school with students you have never met before is a difficult task, but a useful one for candidates and those making the appointment. The evaluation of the lesson by the candidate is crucial. I need to see someone who can be self-critical but who also recognizes when things go well. Someone who makes suggestions as to how the lesson may have gone better, what they would do differently with hindsight. I like to hear them talk of the individual student's progress in the lesson, and how they would follow it up. Remembering pupils' names is always impressive. I'd rather see an ambitious lesson that goes a bit awry than a safe boring one.

2. What questions should you ask?

First, only ask questions you cannot get answers to through research, for example, by investigating, you may easily determine how many students attend the school so, think of a different question to ask. Be sure you think carefully about what questions you would like answered. make them genuine. and recognize that it is always advantageous to ask questions. Remember, don't try to dominate the interview with your questions, keep in mind you are the interviewee. A good idea is to practice asking the questions you created in front of a mirror the day before the meeting. Write your questions down on a professional pad of paper or an index card and bring them to the interview.

3. Do you have a passion for the profession?

I love education. I think that it is imperative to be a lifelong learner when one is a teacher. I plan to continue my education by (fill in this blank with your own plans). 

Technology continues to evolve into a strategic part of education. Tablet PCs and hand held devices are the newest gadgets on the market for students to use; the internet is
an incredible resource. Technology provides interactive, individualized learning experiences, increasing student engagement and efficiency - in safer and more secure

Multiculturalism and securing equal opportunities for all are important themes in education.

And, of course, teaching to state standards to upgrade student academic progress is very important.

4. Please explain your classroom management plan?

My general classroom management plan is to make my classroom feel like a home to every student. I want them to feel valued, intelligent, safe, and comfortable. I want
them to respect me, the teacher, and each other and to show that respect by treating everyone with kindness and caring.

The class environment must be conducive to learning so I welcome everyone's opinions and encourage and respect student differences. I try to understand the expectations
of my students and make them aware of my expectations. I always make it a point to clearly communicate my expectations at the beginning of the school year. In this
way, I ensure that the students and I are moving toward the same goal - learning for all. I establish firm, but fair and consistent discipline. I try to maintain a regular schedule each day. If the classroom is well-managed and teaching is effective, the participants in this learning environment will learn, grow, and become responsible

5. Tell me what can you contribute to our school community/teaching team?

I am the type of teacher who shares with my peers the classroom experiences that I have had, whether good or bad. I do this because I believe that this the best way for me
and other teachers to improve our teaching. In this way, I get to share with them the best of my skills and, in return, they share with me the best of their skills. I also find
that this is a very good way to learn how to handle situations that are difficult or unusual. The feeling of not being alone, but being part of a team of teachers, is what I can bring to the school. This will help build morale and a great working environment.

6. How do you differentiate your teaching? Provide us some of examples?

My teaching is unique in the sense that while teaching approach is holistic, it is also inclusive and individualized. It is holistic because I not only share knowledge with my students, but I also elicit knowledge from them. For instance, when I was teaching mathematics, I didn't simply teach formulas and methods of solving mathematical problems. I also explained to my students the value of understanding numbers and the great things we can use math for, such as the ability to think logically. I include all students in my lessons. For those who have difficulty, I use cooperative learning, peer tutors, and re-teaching techniques. I attend to the individual needs of the students by modifying assignments. For example, when I had a group of gifted children in my class, I
regularly gave them special assignments to work on that would stimulate higher level thinking skills and had them present their work to the class.

7. Tell me do you enjoy teaching children?

What I most enjoy in teaching is hearing my students explain, in their own words, what they learned in a particular lesson and watching them enjoy participating in a lesson. When you observe my class, you will see that I get my students engaged in our discussions and activities. You will see that my students actively participate in each lesson. I make sure that all of them have a chance to speak, express their thoughts, and share them with the class. I enjoy how their faces brighten every time I recognize their efforts to learn by saying, "Very good," "That's a great idea," "Good job," and other encouraging phrases. At the end of the lesson, you will hear the students explain what they learned. Most of all, you'll know that I enjoy teaching because the children in my class look happy.

8. Tell me what do you do to accommodate a student with an IEP?

An Individualized Education Plan will be successful if proper coordination and collaboration are emphasized by the teacher, parents, psychologist, and other school staff. I accommodate a student with an IEP by planning a series of in-depth discussions with the parents to learn about the student's diagnosis and needs and later to inform the
parents of his progress. This allows me to design an education program that addresses his specific needs and puts into place special accommodations. I also will document my own observations and evaluations of the student's academic work and behavior. As I gain knowledge and information about the student with the IEP, it will be easier for me to decide on the lessons and teaching and learning styles I should use to accommodate his needs and maximize his learning. There are many types of accommodations, depending on the student's diagnosis, for example, instructing a student through the use of
 manipulative's, providing a seat near the front of the room, reinforcing positive behavior every few minutes, providing extra time for assignments, and giving tests orally instead
of in writing.

9. Do you have any questions for us Stella?

An interview isn't just about responding to the prospective school district's questions; it is an opportunity for you to impress the panel with examples of your foresight regarding the position they are offering. By asking questions, you can also determine if the fit is right, it shows interest in the position, and helps to develop rapport. If you feel comfortable, and the interviewer seems amenable, you may ask questions at appropriate times throughout the interview. Once you have been in the interview for a few minutes, you will start to get a feel for your comfort level in this regard. If you don't ask questions during the interview, you will most likely be given the chance to do so at the end of the interview ... be sure to take advantage of this great opportunity!

10. What are some of the trends, issues, and methodologies in education that relate to your specific curriculum area or grade level?

Here are some trends, issues, and methodologies that relate to most subjects and grade levels. You might say:

It seems that increasingly students have more information and knowledge than ever before due to access to the internet. A teacher has to be aware of what the internet
is, how it can be used in positive ways, and how to protect students from negative influences on the internet.
It can be a powerful learning tool for students. In addition,
technology in general has changed education greatly. Using computers, videos, and other kinds of technology makes lessons more interesting and more fun. It also makes it
easier to teach students with varying needs. A computer with internet access can open the world up to the classroom.

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