1. Are you willing to work overtime or odd hours?

Be completely honest. You don't want to lie to get the job if you're not going to work the hours required.

2. Tell me what has been your biggest professional disappointment?

When discussing a professional disappointment, make sure to discuss a scenario you could not control. Be positive about the experience and accept personal responsibility where applicable.

3. Are you able to relocate if required?

Be completely honest and thoughtful with this one. You don't want to wake up one to find out that you're moving to a new city or state and it may be a major factor in your eligibility for employment. But again, if you don't want to move then the job probably isn't for you.

4. Please explain what is your philosophy towards work?

This is typically a straightforward question that merits a straightforward answer. Do you have strong worth ethic? Will you do whatever it takes to make sure the job gets done? Just say so in your response. Keep it short, direct and positive.

5. What is the most irritating thing you've experienced about your co-workers?

This question is designed to find out if you get along well on team, with other and whether or not you'll be a fit with the interviewer's organization. It's a trap. Think real hard but fail to come up anything that irritated you about your co-workers. A short positive response is best.

6. Do you consider yourself a successful person?

You should always answer yes to this question. Briefly explain why without going on and on. If you communicate that you're more successful than you really are you may come off as arrogant or unrealistic. A goof explanation is that you have set professional goals and that you have met some of these goals and are on track to meet more in the near future.

7. Tell me what have you learned from mistakes on the job?

Candidates without specific examples often do not seem credible. However, the example shared should be fairly inconsequential, unintentional, and a learned lesson should be gleaned from it. Moving ahead without group assistance while assigned to a group project meant to be collaborative is a good example.

8. Why did you leave your last job related to the abilities?

Regardless of why you left your last job make sure to stay positive. Always smile and focus on the positive reason such you were seeking the opportunity to expand your career opportunities, your interest in working with a new firm that provided greater opportunity, you desired to work in a new location, etc. Don't reference previous job problems or differences with management that caused you to leave. If you stay positive, your answer may help you. If you're negative, you will likely decrease your chances of getting the job for which you're interviewing.

9. What do you consider to be your greatest strength?

There isn't any right answer. Just make sure to make your response positive and true. A few good examples include: Your ability to solve complex problems, Your ability to work well on a team, Your ability to shine under pressure, Your ability to focus in chaotic situations, Your ability to prioritize and organize, Your ability to cut through the fluff to identify the real issues, Your ability to influence other positively. If your strength relates to the position in question that will be more beneficial - but again be honest, don't create a strength for yourself just because you think it will sound good.

10. Tell us what relevant work experience do you have in this career field?

Talk about specific work related experience for the position you're interviewing for. Make sure the experience is relevant. Don't talk about previous experience that is not related to the position in question. If you don't have specific career related experience speak about prior experience that has helped you develop the specific knowledge and skills required for the position you are applying for.

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11. How well do you perform under pressure?

This is a fair question, as potential employers want to know if you're going to be able to get the job done even when things get a little bit stressful. You may say that you thrive under pressure or that you're able to get the job done even when things get a little bit stressful, just make sure to provide some real world examples of your ability to work under pressure in a prior job.

12. How do you believe you would benefit our organization?

This is a great question that provides you the opportunity to put your best foot forward, to tell the interviewer why he or she should consider hiring you for the job. Make sure you're well prepared for this question as you won't likely get a second chance to really shine.

13. Everyone has made some poor decisions or has done something that just did not turn out right. Give an example of when this has happened to you?

In my freshman psychology class, we had to do a group project and presentation, and we got to pick our group members. I was a freshman, and inexperienced with group projects, so I picked two of my friends, even though I knew that they were not hard workers and didn't care about their grades. At the time, I didn't care that they weren't good students, I just wanted to be comfortable with the people I was working with. I ended up doing most of the project very last minute and by myself because I couldn't get them to work on it with me. The project and presentation were both really bad, and all three of our final grades were almost 10 points lower because of it. Needless to say, I never picked a friend as a group member, again, unless I knew he or she was diligent in school. I learned to be more strategic about team members and also how to motivate people who are not as enthusiastic as I am.

14. Would you like to share what people say about you?

You don't want to say that everyone loves to work with you but you do want to have a few positive examples of co-workers who enjoyed working with you with an explanation why.

15. Tell me if you were hiring a person for this job, what would you look for?

Discuss qualities you possess required to successfully complete the job duties.

16. Tell us what type of salary are you looking for?

This can be a very tricky question as the individual asking it is probably digging for something other than a simple answer to the question. We recommend that you don't immediately respond to the question directly. Instead, say something like, "That a difficult question. What is range for this position?" More often than not the interviewer will tell you. If the interviewer insists on direct answer you may want say that it depends on the details of the job - then give a wide salary range.

17. Tell us how do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience?

The first thing you should do is discuss experience you have the interviewer is unfamiliar with. Once that is detailed, tell the person conducting the interview that you are able to learn new tasks and information in a reasonable period of time and possess a strong work ethic. However, only state this if you can live up to these expectations.

18. Have you ever you have been in a position where you've had to fire someone? How did you feel about that experience?

Be very thoughtful about your answer. This is a very serious matter for most companies and requires a very serious answer. You need to express that you will do it when it is the right thing to do but you don't want to give the impression that you're callus to the process. Don't forget that firing is not the same as laying someone off - it typically is for the direct benefit of the company.

19. Tell us about a time when you helped resolve a dispute between others?

Be sure to discuss a very specific example. Tell the interviewer what methods you used to solve the problem without focusing on the details of the problem.

20. Tell me about a suggestion you have made that has benefited an organization you've worked for?

This is another opportunity to show the interviewer what you're capable of so make sure to be prepared for this type of question. Have an example ready and make sure its an example of a suggestion you've made that was accepted and that have positive influence. If you can come up with an example that relates to the position you're applying for that would be even better.

21. Do you think you are an overqualified for this position?

No matter your previous job experience or educational background, be sure to tell the interviewer you have the knowledge and skills to successfully execute the job responsibilities.

22. Tell us what position do you prefer on a team working on a project?

Do not claim to be comfortable with a specific role if you in are in fact not comfortable with it. However, if you have no problem working in certain roles or situations, be sure to discuss this with the interviewer.

23. What type of people do you not work well with?

Be very careful answering this question as most organization employ professionals with an array of personalities and characteristics. You don't want to give the impression that you're going to have problems working with anyone currently employed at the organization. If you through out anything trivial you're going to look like a whiner. Only disloyalty to the organization or lawbreaking should be on your list of personal characteristics of people you can't work with.

24. Please tell me what is your dream job?

There is almost no good answer to this question, so don't be specific. If you tell the interviewer that the job you're applying for with his/her company is the perfect job you may loose credibility if you don't sound believable (which you probably won't if you're not telling the truth.) If you give the interviewer some other job the interviewer may get concerned that you'll get dissatisfied with the position if you're hired. Again, don't be specific. A good response could be, "A job where my work ethic and abilities are recognized and I can make a meaningful difference to the organization."

25. Give me an example of when you were able to meet the personal and professional (or academic) demands in your life yet still maintained a healthy balance?

My sophomore summer I studied abroad in Europe for six weeks with a program through my university. We were in Innsbruck, Austria, and I loved everything about the town and its surroundings, as well as every place I traveled to on the weekends. There was always something to see or do that was more fun and exciting than class, but I also knew that I couldn't make bad grades that would lower my GPA. To get the most time out of my weekend travels and weekdays in Innsbruck, I always did homework on the train on the weekends and for a few hours every day after class. I ended my summer abroad with many new friends, good grades, and great stories to tell of the cities I saw and adventures I went on.

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26. How long do you want to work for us if we hire you?

Here being specific is probably not the best approach. You may consider responding, "I hope a very long time." Or "As long as we're both happy with my performance."

27. Describe a time when you took personal accountability for a conflict and initiated contact with the individual(s) involved to explain your actions?

As a member of the executive board of my fraternity, I was involved in decisions with where to do our community-service projects at times. At one point, the community-service chairman asked me where I thought he should make the next event. I told him we should do an event at the Boys and Girls Club. Some fraternity members complained to the community-service chairman about the decision because they wanted an easier event. I took responsibility for the choice and spoke to the individuals about my reasoning. I told them that I felt the event would make more of a difference in the community than cleaning up a road as we usually do since it would allow us to be mentors to troubled youth as well as provide them with a cleaner building to use. It was better than simply doing manual labor and ended up being a successful event that everyone plans on doing again in the future.

28. Tell us about the most fun you have had on the job?

When answering this question, discuss situations where you completed tasks benefitting your previous employers.

29. How do you measure success?

There may be several good answers. Some include: you're able to set realistic, yet aggressive goals that push you and you're able to achieve them, you go the extra mile on all projects, client satisfaction is high, your boss is elated at your performance on all projects, etc.

30. Explain what have you done to improve your skills over the past year?

You'll want to be prepare with some very specific examples of what you've done over the last year and what you're currently doing to improve your professional knowledge and skill set as well as anything else you're doing the shows self improvement.

31. Describe a situation where you felt you had not communicated well. How did you correct the situation?

Recently I had a situation where I was giving a presentation to a company and one of the upper managers had to step out during my presentation. He returned after I was done and was taking down my setup, and he asked if he could ask a question, I jokingly replied "no more questions" and then offered, "yes, of course, I would be happy to answer a question for you." Despite the fact that he had laughed at my initial joke, it was clear to me that it had not been received well. I then made certain that I went up to him and apologized and made it clear that I meant no disrespect and that sometimes I just become comfortable with people very quickly. He told me that I needed to be aware of my audience. This is something I have always known, but I believe the sting of this specific event has really brought it to light for me.

32. Can you explain what qualities do you look for in a boss?

Remain optimistic and do not be too specific. Good attributes include moral character, honesty, and intelligence since managers usually believe they possess these qualities.

33. Can you explain do you have any blind spots?

This question is often meant to trick candidates since acknowledgment of blind spots would indicate they were aware of them. Also, do not disclose bad habits or other personal concerns. Let the interviewer find out about your personal flaws through the course of the interview without directly stating these flaws.

34. If you had enough money to retire would you?

Just be honest. If you would retire then say so. But since you can't retire, and the interviewer already knows this, simply answer that since you can't this is type of work you prefer doing. However, if you wouldn't retire if you had the money then explain why. Work is an important element of happiness for most people and many won't retire even when they can.

35. Do you know anyone that works with our company?

Sometimes companies have policies relating to the hiring of individuals related to current company employees. If you are related to anyone working for the company make sure you're aware of company policies before you enter the interview. If you have a friend or acquaintance working for the company make sure have good relationship with this individual before mentioning them.

36. Some people consider themselves to be "big picture people" and others are detail oriented. Which are you? Give an example that illustrates your preference?

I believe that to be successful, you have to be both a big-picture person and detail oriented. You can't get caught up in just the details or you will lose sight of the long-term goals. And you can't get caught up in just looking at the big picture, or you will fail because of the lack of detail. As the group leader of a project for my marketing class, I definitely had to be both a big-picture person and detail oriented. I had to make sure that everyone was doing their part and working toward the goal of the project while, at the same time, checking every piece of the paper to make sure even the minuscule parts of the paper were correct and in place. Through using both skills, we earned an A on the project.

37. Explain me your work ethic?

While discussing this, be sure to stress specific examples of what you bring to the company. Good qualities include resolve to fulfill job responsibilities, optimism, and a desire to be as efficient as possible while at work.

38. Did you consider yourself a team player?

Of course you're a team player - who isn't. But a simple yes probably isn't the response the interviewer is looking for. Be ready to provide specific example of how you've worked as part of a cohesive team to get things accomplished and how you've focus on team performance rather than individual performance. Make sure not to brag as this will make it appear as that you're more concerned about your own performance and accomplishments than those of the team.

39. Tell about a time when you built rapport quickly with someone under difficult conditions?

While managing a high-end mall jewelry store in which the clientele are usually quite well-mannered and soft-spoken, I returned from a lunch break to find one of our newer sales associates struggling with an irate and somewhat irrational customer. Voices were escalating, with the customer spewing negative comments that could be heard from within the mall. While maintaining good relationships with our customers is a hallmark of our company, this particular situation was not ordinary by any means. I could tell the sales associate was in over his head with this encounter, so I quickly walked into the conversation - argument - and proceeded to ask the customer several key questions so that I could both calm her down while also discovering more about her situation so that I could then defuse the confrontation and restore order in the store. In the process of talking with her, I found we had a common love of dogs and were able to talk about our dogs - sharing some funny stories - before getting back to her specific problem with the store. In the end, it turns out the company that handles our credit card had been double-billing her account, and I was able to make a phone call and solve her problem.

40. What motivates you at the work place?

Keep your answer simple, direct and positive. Some good answers may be the ability to achieve, recognition or challenging assignments.

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41. Describe me your management style?

Try to avoid specific classifications, whatever it may be. Organizations usually prefer managers who can adapt their skills to different situations.

42. Please tell me what do you know about our company?

You always want to make sure that you're pretty familiar with the company that you're interviewing with. Nothing looks worse than a candidate who knows nothing about the company they say they're interested in working for. Find out everything you can about the company, its culture and its goals. You will also want to know how the company is positioned in its market as well as who its major competitors are.

43. Give an example of when you took a risk to achieve a goal. What was the outcome?

When I decided to study abroad one spring, I had to weigh the pros and cons of the decision. People who study abroad typically get worse grades abroad than at home because of the educational and cultural differences, so I had to consider the risk to my GPA. I also had to consider how expensive it would be to live abroad without being allowed to have a job, so there was a financial risk as well. On top of this, when studying abroad at this particular university, because of the difference in education, I was allowed to take only 3 courses, which was significant to me because I already was on a strict schedule from switching majors so late in my college career. So I also had to consider the risk of cramming my schedule with difficult classes in my senior year. But I knew that this was going to be a life-changing experience that I may never get to participate in again. So I took the risk and studied abroad. Now, I have that experience, and it has prepared me better for my career. It shows that I can overcome great challenges and have been immersed into foreign culture, which is important in my career in the art industry.

44. What would your previous employer say is your greatest strength?

Be prepared for this question. If you have to sit and think about it it's going to appear as if you're not sure or that you've never identified your own value in the work place - not good. You don't have to have a complex response. Keep it simple and honest. For example, several possibilities could be Leadership, Problem solving ability, Initiative, Energy, Work ethic, Innovative, etc., etc

45. What has disappointed you about a previous job?

Again, this question could get you in trouble so tread carefully. Some good answers might be that your previous job didn't provide any room for growth, that you were laid off due to a mandatory reduction in staff, that they closed their office in your state and required you to relocate, etc. Make sure not to mention anything negative about the people you worked with, the company in general or the job itself.

46. Describe a project or situation that best demonstrates your analytical abilities?

During my Marketing Research course, we were assigned a group project to do marketing research for a local business. After we collected all of the data, we had to analyze the data in a meaningful way for the business and report the results. It turned out that I had the strongest analytical abilities in the group, so I led the rest of the group in analyzing the data. Because of my analytical skills, we found that the business had been targeting the wrong market all along and were able to show the owner the market segment that the business should be targeting.

47. Tell me about a problem or disagreement you had with previous supervisor?

This question is trap. It is meant to see whether or not you'll speak poorly of an employer. No one wants to hire someone who's going to speak poorly of them down the road. Stay upbeat and positive - and most of all don't say anything negative about a previous employer.

48. Are you currently looking at other job opportunities?

Just answer this question honestly. Sometime an employer wants to know if there are other companies you're considering so that they can determine how serious you are about the industry, they're company and find out if you're in demand. Don't spend a lot of time on this question; just try to stay focused on the job you're interviewing for.

49. Tell me a little bit about your abilities?

This is probably the most commonly asked question that occurs at the beginning of an interview. Be ready with a short prepared answer but make sure it doesn't sound rehearsed. And don't start blabbering on about your personal life. Limit your answer to your career background and experience unless specifically asked about your personal life. Talk about past jobs as well as work experience that is related to the position you're interviewing for.

50. Did the salary we offer attract you to this job?

The interviewer could be asking you this question for a number of reasons. Obviously, the salary is an important factor to your interest in this job, but it should not be the overriding reason for your interest. A good answer to this question is, "The salary was very attractive, but the job itself is what was most attractive to me."

51. Why do you think you'll do well at this job?

Provide several reasons including skills, experience and interest. If you can show how you've been successful in a similar career field or job position that will go along way to helping the interviewer believe you'll also be successful at this new job.

52. Tell me why do you want to work for this company?

Again be honest. The interviewer will be able to sense very quickly if you're be disingenuous. Your answer should be base on your person reasons, career aspirations as well as research you've performed on the company. The most important thing you should do is make sure to relate your answer to your long-term career goals.