1. What is in telephonic interview?

Telephone interviews are often conducted by employers in the initial interview round of the hiring process, this type of interview allows an employer to screen candidates on the candidates experience, qualifications, and salary expectations pertaining to the position and the company. The telephone interview saves the employers' time and eliminates candidates that are unlikely to meet the company's expectations. Employers tend to perform telephone interviews as a structured interview.

2. What questions Not to ask on a phone interview?

❋ Will I have to work overtime?
❋ Are the working hours flexible?
❋ Can I work from home?
❋ Does this job require that I pass a Drug and Background check?
❋ How much does this position pay?
❋ What type of health insurance does the company offer?
❋ Is there public transportation in the company's area?
❋ How many weeks of vacation time/ sick time do you offer?

3. What questions to ask employers on a phone interview?

✿ What are the day-to-day responsibilities of this job?
✿ How will my leadership responsibilities and performance be measured? By whom?
✿ Who will review my performance? How often?
✿ What is the company's plan for the next five years, and how does this department fit in?
✿ Could you describe your company's management style and the type of employee who fits well within it?
✿ Who is the company's competition? What are the company's strengths and weaknesses compared to its competition?
✿ What is the company's policy on providing education, workshops, and training so employees can keep up their skills or acquire new ones?

4. How well do you handle stress and pressure at work? Please give an example of how you overcame a stressful situation?

The correct answer is that you work well under pressure, and you enjoy working in an environment that is challenging. It's good for the employer to know that you are an individual who has the capability to diffusing stress while working in demanding environments with deadlines.

5. Why are you the one we should hire? As you know we have spoken with several candidates?

Give detailed examples of your skills and accomplishments. Be positive, and emphasize how your background matches their job description.

6. How many years experience do you have in _________?

this is a close-ended question, give a direct answer and the only other thing you should add would be your proficiency with this particular skill. Just because you may have 5 years of experience with something doesn't necessarily mean you are a master at that skill. Being as honest as possible will help eliminate the possibility of setting yourself up for failure.

7. What do you know about this company/job that you are applying for?

This question is used to see if you have prepared for the interview. Candidates that have researched the company are more appealing. Companies like prepared, organized candidates.

8. How much do you have managerial experience or are you more of an individual contributor?

If you do not, then it is ok to say that you are an individual contributor, if you do have managerial experience then elaborate on your experience, let them know; when, where, how many people did you manage, your responsibilities as a manager, etc.. Note: good managers talk about their employees and their employee's growth, development, each employees responsibilities, etc.

9. Tell me have you received any raises or promotions at your current employer?

This is a pretty straight forward question, either you have or you haven't. Either way it is always good to discuss your promotions and if you haven't been promoted, then keep the conversation positive:
which means no negative discussions!

10. Tell me what size groups do you work in and do you have any group size preferences?

This is a question to see how comfortable you working with other people. It is always best to be honest, with the employer and yourself. If you really don't like working in larger groups or around lots of people then let them know Maybe the job isn't an exact fit for you and that's OK because there will be many other opportunities out there that may provide you with your ideal work environment. Phone interviews and in person interviews are also a perfect opportunity for you the candidate to be interviewing the employer, to verify if their company/job is best for you!

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11. On a Day-to-Day basis at your current job, what are your primary responsibilities?

This question is to test your ability to articulate in fine detail what you do at your current employer. If your memory is not that great, you should prepare yourself with some details. Note: never regurgitate the information directly off of your resume as this shows that you are unable to have an intellectual conversation!

12. How long have you been with your current employer?

This is a simple close-ended question, simply answer the question honestly! If it wasn't a substantial length of time, just give a logical and positive explanation. "Remember; always be as positive as possible."

13. Tell me why are you considering leaving your current employer?

If your answer is because you hate your boss, you just lost this opportunity! No employer ever likes to hear negative discussions about your current or prior work engagements. Any negative discussions will be portrayed as "red flags" to the employer which are not good for you. Depending on your circumstance there could be many answers to this question. Simply give a positive response with a logical explanation such as "I decided to relocate so that I could be closer to my family" or "I've been at my current employer for 8 years and I've reached my maximum potential, so I've decided to search for a new and challenging opportunities", etc.

14. What is the most important thing you're looking for in a company/job?

And no, the answer should never be more money! Even if that is the real answer! The correct answer should be; a new challenge with an opportunity for growth and development. Employers truly want candidates that can offer an immediate impact on their business, including applicable skills, education and experience, but also candidates that are interested in new challenges and want to continue to develop and grow within new work environments!

15. Tell me about your current employer?

This question is used to show how well you know your own business and how detail oriented you are or may be.

16. When were you last employed and what is the reason that you are no longer there?

If you are not employed be honest about your employment dates both verbally and written on your resume. Note: Always remember, "do not talk negatively about your previous employers or employment situations", no matter how much you want to!

17. Are you currently employed and where?

In an ideal situation, you don't want to leave one job without having another lined up; always answer this question direct to the point and honestly.
Note: no negative talk even if your previous job came to a bitter end!

18. What is your education background?

The correct answer is the honest answer. "Direct and straight to the point", is the only thing an employer likes to hear. If you do not have a degree and you are not enrolled in an educational program, don't talk about how you are continuing your education because the truth is you aren't!

19. Tell me a little about yourself?

This question is commonly used by the employer to break the ice and to get the candidate to reveal some basic personality traits. The best response would be short and professional. Remember to stay focused as the employer doesn't want to hear anything that doesn't relate to their business!

20. Tell me about your education/employment history? Take me through your CV?

Give a short description of your education or employment history. Most telephone interviews are fairly brief, so don't go into too much detail. Some candidates may even choose to ask a question, such as:
"What would you like to know?", in this situation rather than regurgitate the content on their CV. If you're confident to follow this method, the approach is perfectly acceptable.

21. Suppose there seems to be a gap in your education/employment history. What were you doing during this time?

Be as honest as possible here. If it your break was due to personal reasons, then say that. Those who try to lie, often get found it rather quickly. However, if explained the right way your break need not harm your chance of success.

22. What interests you have about this job?

Demonstrate what you know about the position, and the company in general, and back it up with what makes you the perfect candidate for the role. It's all about matching a skill you possess, with skills required in the job description. And some subtle ego-stroking.

23. Tell me what salary are you looking for?

A realistic, but non-specific salary bracket e.g. I'm looking for a starting salary somewhere between 20,000 and 25,000.
Speaking about salary can be awkward for some applicants, and during a telephone interview is no exception.
Honesty is the best policy here. Give a broad salary range which you feel is realistic to the role, its responsibilities and your previous experience. Any further negotiations can be brought up later in the interview stage.

24. Tell me what are your greatest achievements?

Any achievements which may relate to an attribute required for the role (check job description). For example, if they ask for someone who works well in a team, you could talk about a group project you took charge of which lead to excellent results.
Similar in intention to the previous question, a recruiter may ask this as a way of vetting which candidates are telling the truth on their CV.
So if it's written down for a recruiter to see, make sure you can actually quantify each individual accomplishment listed, and answer a few questions around them. And by questions, we mean more than reading the exact same sentence they've already read.

25. Do you know what were your main responsibilities in your last job?

List a few of your main duties in a way that deviates from what you've already said on your CV. Position your answer to include what experience you have that makes you right for this position.
The purpose of many telephone interviews is to find out if candidates can really back up what they say on their CV, especially when put on the spot.
Make sure you have a copy of your CV to hand, and practice a concise explanation about each of the main duties completed during your most recent position. When this question comes up, simply expand upon each point confidently and, ideally, in a way which may relate to the role you're interviewing for.

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26. What do you know about the company?

Many employers ask this question at some point in the process to find out what your preparation skills are like. In other words, it's research time
Take some time to look at what the company do, what the role entails, and any other information you can get to help paint a picture of the business. The company website is the best place to start, but feel free to look at as many sources as possible. Showing a range of different research will really start demonstrating to the employer how much you want the job.
☛ A short overview of the company, any memorable dates (such as when they were founded), and a basic mission statement is a great start.

27. Tell me why are you leaving your current position?

Usually asked at the start of an interview, this is an opportunity to find out straight away how good you are at thinking on your feet.
The easiest way to think on your feet in this situation is simply to think ahead. It may sound obvious, but if you know the question is likely to come up, a little time rehearsing a potential answer will help you remain calm and collected.
Something short, positive and relatively non-specific e.g. I didn't find the work challenging enough, and that's what I really like about this position'. Always be prepared to give examples.